Thu. Dec 8th, 2022

VietNamNet Bridge – Hundreds of types of bombs, mines and explosives left over from the war are on display at the Museum of infantry, 290 B Lac Long Quan Road, Hanoi, including a bomb of nearly 7 tons in weight.

 

bombs, mines, explosive, exhibition of bombs and mines, museum of infantry 

Vietnam was the first place where the giant bomb, known as BLU-82 or
“Daisy Cutter,” was released in the 1960-1970 period. The bombs were so
big that they were transported by C130 transport planes and on every
flight, only two bombs were transported.

 

bombs, mines, explosive, exhibition of bombs and mines, museum of infantry 

This kind of bomb aims at clearing trees to make heliport or
artillery battlefields. With a special operation mechanism, the bomb can
be detonated on the ground to flatten everything in an area of up to
100,000 m2. However, sources said that the BLU-82 was also used to
destroy enemy troops, causing great damage.
 

 

bombs, mines, explosive, exhibition of bombs and mines, museum of infantry 

In contrast to the giant bomb–in the center of the museum is the
smallest bomb with a weight of only 45 kg – on par with a large-sized
shell.

 

bombs, mines, explosive, exhibition of bombs and mines, museum of infantry

 

 bombs, mines, explosive, exhibition of bombs and mines, museum of infantry

The museum also preserves the largest ever known torpedo with a
diameter of over 2.5 meters, containing 180 kg of C4 explosive.
According to information collected, this torpedo was the “secret
weapon,” without only 10 used to demolish the Ham Rong Bridge in Thanh
Hoa province. The expense for research and manufacturing the 10
torpedoes is estimated at $1 billion (1965 price).

 

bombs, mines, explosive, exhibition of bombs and mines, museum of infantry 

Many other kinds of torpedoes were used by the U.S. troops in Vietnam to blockade river mouths and estuaries.

 

bombs, mines, explosive, exhibition of bombs and mines, museum of infantry 

After the war, the most lethal weapon is not big bombs but the small bomblets.

 

bombs, mines, explosive, exhibition of bombs and mines, museum of infantry 

A pineapple-shaped bomblet contains 300 balls (like bicycle balls), damage range of 10 meters.

 

bombs, mines, explosive, exhibition of bombs and mines, museum of infantry 

This pineapple-shaped bomb contains 450 balls, 15 meter range of damage.

 

bombs, mines, explosive, exhibition of bombs and mines, museum of infantry 

Contrary to the bright, eye-catching looks of all kinds of bombs and
mines, more than 40,000 people died and were wounded in 1975-2000. Most
of them are children and working-age people. Every year, Vietnam has to
spend $100 million for bomb and mine clearing. That is not including the
cost of ground clearance for the construction.

 

bombs, mines, explosive, exhibition of bombs and mines, museum of infantry 

The map on mine data of the U.S. Air Force in Vietnam in the
1964-1972 period (provided by the U.S. mine data center). The U.S.
military used more than 15 million tons of bombs, mines, explosive
during the Vietnam War. The remnants are estimated at five percents,
equivalent to 800,000 tons. The central provinces of Quang Binh and
Quang Tri are two locations with the highest density of mines.
 

 

VNE

By vivian